Posts by BoiseBetties

Blue Lake Duathlons

Posted on Jul 12, 2017 in Racing Report

Looks like 31 😉 Run! Olympic Duathlon Finish #Bettieup Two Betties on the...

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Sawtooth Relay

Posted on Jul 12, 2017 in Racing Report

The Betties had two teams on the course, but only have photos from one of the teams here.  The other photos are coming soon! Pictured here: Shea, Gabby, Bridget, Melinda, Angenie and Gretchen take on the 61 mile relay (in that order).  In the end, the team took the Women’s Open title once again!  Great work to all and thanks for all of the fun times 🙂     Pre race team selfie Teammate hand-up Awkward Exchange Gretchen on Galena All smiles from Shea Em stays the course Gabby and Bridget A meeting of the Bettie Teams Women’s Open...

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Heart & Sole: Survivor’s Perspective on SCAD

Posted on Feb 7, 2017 in DR. BETTIE, Guest Blog, Uncategorized

Heart & Sole: Survivor’s Perspective on SCAD

Cynthia Mauzerall was planing to race the USATF Cross Country Championships with the Boise Betties’ masters team.  Just a month before the race, she suffered a heart attack.  It was an incredibly scary time for our team.  Here Cynthia shares her perspective on the events immediately following the event.   When I woke up, I saw faces staring at me-friendly, helpful, concerned, surprised.  Family members were tearing up and I had no idea why.  The only words I could think to say were, “hi” and “what am I doing here?”  My husband was told he would be sharing the details with me over and over again until my memory got stronger.  When I was informed that I had suffered a Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection (SCAD), I wasn’t sure how to wrap my arms around that.  Frankly, I thought maybe they made a mistake.  I asked myself, “Are they overreacting?” The look on the faces of the team of doctors suggested it was true.  Amongst this team of white lab coats was one of my best friends since age 15.  Certainly she will tell me what’s what.  Dr. Jen (formally known as Dr. Jennifer Anderson) was calm and composed and yet seemed to empathize with how odd all this was to me.  She likely knew I had to grasp that this was serious enough that I would not be heading out the door for a run any time soon. Once the doctors left the room, I searched for evidence.  What are all these tubes, catheters, and scars?  Family explained that a stent was placed over the dissected artery.  I began to feel pain in my chest and ribs.  They told me that was CPR that was conducted by 2 everyday heroes at the gym- a retired paramedic and a physical therapist.  Slowly I ventured out of detective mode into one of Gratitude.  I was grateful for Family and for amazing medical team that despite their current unassuming demeanor had to respond at lightning speed with limited information when I arrived at the ER.  I was grateful for those who stepped up and did CPR knowing that it might not make a difference. The theme of gratitude has been on my mind continually- much because my story was filled with events that now seem rather miraculous.  However, I am also grateful for mindfulness and science.  Dr. Jen and her team keep abreast of advancements and case studies in Cardiology.  In fact, Dr. Jen has been known to stash The New England Journal of Medicine in her bathroom for “easy reading”.  A new gratefulness has emerged for curiosity and mindfulness.  Dr. Jen has reiterated that we are experts on what are bodies are communicating to us.  We need to listen, to be curious, to ask questions.  I had ben slowing down substantially on my runs and workouts but felt foolish mentioning it to anyone.  I felt lucky to be as active as I am at 42.  I could have simply said, “Maybe this is nothing, but….” We don’t have to be MDs to be mindful of our bodies, and what they communicate to us.  There are folks out there like Dr. Jen whose passion is to understand what the symptoms mean, we just have to vocalize those...

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Heart & Sole: The Betties to Run for Women’s Heart Health Awareness

Posted on Feb 3, 2017 in DR. BETTIE, Uncategorized

Heart & Sole: The Betties to Run for Women’s Heart Health Awareness

The phone call came on what seemed to be an otherwise typical busy day in the hospital.  “I’ve got a bit of an unusual case here, ” the emergency room physician began.  “A 42 year-old woman was found down at the gym…” I had a fleeting thought of “jeez, I hope I don’t know her”, but refocused my attention on the rest of my colleague’s information.  This certainly was an unusual case…  He described her as a fit looking woman, who had no signs to suggest that she otherwise had a heart problem.  However, we both had a high level of suspicion that she may have suffered a heart-related event.   We made a quick plan over the phone, and I immediately headed to the emergency room to take a look at her.  It was moments later that yes, indeed, our Jane Doe was someone that I knew.  But not only was she someone that I knew… she was one of my closest friends. It is always difficult to see individuals arrive in such a critical state of illness.  They have wires and tubes attached to their bodies.  Though they are draped hastily in a hospital gown, there is no room for modesty, and some level of unintentional exposure is inevitable.  There may be bruises or blood.  They may be agitated and moving their limbs in awkward and uncoordinated ways.  This was not the way my friend was supposed to look.  Even though I knew she was not in a state to hear me, I promised her that we would sort this out.  I swiftly placed a hollow tube into her artery and thread my way to the blood vessels supplying her heart.  When the dye that illuminated her arteries clearly suggested the culprit, I must admit that I felt some level of shock:  My friend had, indeed, experienced a heart attack. Recent studies suggest that we are becoming more aware of the fact that heart disease remains the number one killer of women in America.  While one in 31 women dies from breast cancer each year, heart disease claims the lives of one in three.   This is equivalent to roughly one death each minute.  Unfortunately, studies also suggest that younger women are less aware of the importance of heart disease compared to older women.  This is extremely important, as heart disease affects all ages, and raising awareness may save lives.   Like my friend, heart disease can affect healthy, fit individuals who abide by good eating habits and have never smoked a cigarette.  Yet there are other more subtle risk factors, such as knowing your family history and your blood cholesterol numbers, that are important to recognize.  It is also important to understand that symptoms of heart disease may be atypical – and may be mistaken for anxiety, gut pain, or just general fatigue.  We need to listen to our bodies.  We need to listen to each other.  We need to know our own risk factors, and we need to discuss these with our medical providers. It is with great relief, awe and gratitude that I can share my friend’s story and her happy ending.  She is now home with her beautiful family, and her heart is beginning to heal.  She has returned to work, and has started some light exercise with our cardiac rehabilitation program (which she described to me as “fun”).  She continues to inspire us all, and has generously agreed to share her story with our community.  This weekend, the USATF Cross Country National Championship running races will be held in Bend, Oregon, and our...

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An Awesome Partnership with St. Luke’s Sports Medicine

Posted on Jan 20, 2016 in SPONSORS, Uncategorized

The Boise Betties are super excited to announce that we have been selected by St. Luke’s Sports Medicine as a sponsored team in 2016!  This is an incredible partnership for our athletes to stay on top of injury prevention and care- a must for any level of athlete! What does this mean for the members of our running club?  It means that the physical therapists at St. Lukes Orthopedic Rehabilitation gave us an inside line for booking appointments; a chance to nip an injury in the bud.  If injury does set in and our athletes need a cross training option, St. Luke’s has granted us complimentary hours each week on the AlterG treadmill (antigravity treadmill: basically the best thing an injured runner could hope for).  But best of all, our athletes will prevent injuries with the help of comprehensive gait analysis by the pro’s in the sports medicine department. Imagine running on a treadmill, in front of a large grid with little dots stuck on your knees and hips- actually dots on every joint- all in the name of identifying weaknesses in your running form!  Subtle hip drops and twisting torsos will no longer aggravate our Betties to the point of injury.  This is a very cool chance for our team to gain personal insight at a level many elite runners have not yet experienced.  As a new offering at the clinic, we are thrilled to be some of the first in line for the service! 2016 is going to be a great year for our healthy, strong, and balanced Betties!  Thank you St....

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